Service Flood Damage and Fire Damage

November 21, 2016 High Tech Carpet Cleaning Comments Off on Service Flood Damage and Fire Damage

Did you know that some types of Mold, even in small quantities, can be deadly?

In the 1930s, mold was identified as causing deaths of farm animals in Russia and other countries. Mold was found growing on wet grain used for animal feeds. Peasants ate large quantities of rotten food grains and cereals that were heavily overgrown with the Stachybotrys mold and many human deaths occurred.

In the 1970s, building construction techniques changed in response to the changing economic realities, including the energy crisis. As a result, homes and buildings became more airtight. Also, cheaper materials such as drywall came into common use. The newer building materials reduced the drying potential of the structures making moisture problems more prevalent. This combination contributed to increased mold growth inside buildings.

I wrote this guide to help you better understand Mold. If you discover Mold in your dwelling, we hope this information helps you make a decision that best suits the health and safety of you and your family.

In addition, we would like to invite you to schedule a Free Onsite Assessment (onsite within city limits) where we can offer professional advice and options for helping you resolve all of your issues whether its mold damage, water damage, fire damage, odor control… you name it!

Our Customers Matter! You Will Receive The Most Thorough Cleaning Ever, Or It Is Free!

If you have any questions, you’re invited to call us at 250-614-1345. I have dedicated our business to educating clients and friends. We’ll be happy to help.

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For Emergency Restoration, call: (250) 614-1345
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